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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
states and we work on how europe and the united states can work together on the major world challenges like climate change and economic trade and development, just a number of issues the program i run goes back to the early days in the first 20 years when we were primarily a grantmaker making grants to low-cal practitioners and policymakers. i started this program about four years, five years ago now, i think, time flies, to really bring in members of our marshall memorial fellowship network of which david chiu is one of our alumni. some of our past grantees and also the next crop of practitioners and local civic leaders who are really looking to change their home communities by looking abroad or looking to other cities to see what other cities are doing well and how that might be imported back home or translated back home. so the comparative dom particular policy program works primarily in the 25 cities that doug mentioned, but not exclusively in those cities. we really are looking for some of the best practices in education and workforce development, in integration of diverse populat
ideas that we had from the united states. and it was a remarkably fruitful exchange and i think many of us that went on that trip brought back ideas to the united states that we are trying to legislate here locally. i'm also excited to see all of you here in part because some of you know, i'm one member of the board that doesn't have a car, that rides my bicycle many days of the week -- [applause] >> and like all of you, i think we are remarkably excited about the fact that the bike plan is moving forward, the fact that today is the start of the trial on market street, the fact that we are really moving our city's biking agenda forward. and i think with those of our friends from europe, we all want to take this to the next level and figure out what are the best ideas that we can adopt from the great cities around the world. we know that in recent years, i think san francisco with the help of our community advocates from the bike coalition and other advocates were really trying to bike strong and bike hard into the wind and i think finally the wind is at our back. we need the best ide
a question? use the microphone, please. >> separated bike paths in the united states are controversial, and they're slowly catching on. how important is it to have those facilities in place? is it maybe a quarter of importance, 50% of the attraction for people to take their bikes? i'm wondering how important it is. >> i think that you need a cycling infrastructure, both from a statistical point of view and the feeling that people have when they use it. otherwise, we do not think we would have more people cycling if we did not put in more cycling facilities. i think the cycling infrastructure is absolutely necessary. if you want to do something for the other groups, you also have to do a lot when you design your intersections. that is where the most accidents happen and where the people feel the most unsafe. we're focusing very much on the intersections, how to design those. >> the towns in the netherlands have the highest rate of bicycle use. also, in denmark. ithey have all the facilities ad priorities for bicycles. it turns out that these towns have a lot higher bicycle use than else
effort in the state of california and in the country of the united states to try to roll back the horrendous rates of incarceration that have happened in this country over the last 30 years. i mean, that's the context, right? the united states, i think most of you know these numbers now, but we're less than 5% of the world's population but almost 25% of the world's incarcerated population. we rank first in the world in the per capita incarceration of our fellow citizens. the russians are fading fast in second or third place together with the belarus people. the rates of the incarceration are five, six, seven, eight times than most in other societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we'r
the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)